Sunday, April 9, 2017

Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in CrisisHillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance

I noted about halfway through this book that the author was hardly a typical hillbilly. At the age of sixteen, he was "consuming books about public policy." This might explain how he ended up at Harvard, but he makes it clear that there were plenty of opportunities for him to crash and burn. He credits his grandparents, especially his grandmother (Mamaw), with making the difference in his life. She sounded like a force to be reckoned with and somebody you wouldn't want to piss off. As her grandson noted, Mamaw's favorite TV show was "The Sopranos": change the names and dates, and the Italian Mafia starts to look a lot like the Hatfield-McCoy dispute. Vance's family traces their ancestry back to those infamous tribal combatants.

Vance also nails the half-hearted attempts to brighten up blighted downtowns in the rustbelt:

"Efforts to reinvent downtown Middletown always struck me as futile. People didn't leave because our downtown lacked trendy cultural amenities. The trendy cultural amenities left because there weren't enough consumers in Middletown to support them."

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
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