Saturday, March 25, 2017

Rights of Man VS Reflections on the Revolution in France

The Writings of Thomas Paine - Volume 2 (1779-1792): the Rights of ManThe Writings of Thomas Paine - Volume 2 (1779-1792): the Rights of Man by Thomas Paine


Reflections on the Revolution in FranceReflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke
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So you are reading along in Thomas Paine's defense of the French Revolution when you come across a compelling argument as to why his opponent, Edmund Burke, is not only wrong, but morally reprehensible:

"But Mr. Burke appears to have no idea of principles when he is contemplating Governments. 'Ten years ago,' says he, 'I could have felicitated France on her having a Government, without inquiring what the nature of that Government was, or how it was administered.' Is this the language of a rational man? Is it the language of a heart feeling as it ought to feel for the rights and happiness of the human race? On this ground, Mr. Burke must compliment all Governments in the world, while the victims who suffer under them, whether sold into slavery, or tortured out of existence, are wholly forgotten. It is power, not principles, that Mr. Burke venerates; and under this abominable depravity he is disqualified to judge between them." (p. 23)

Oh, that horrid Burke! See!? He's ethically challenged, so his arguments are invalid. But wait. Here's what Burke actually wrote:

"Abstractedly speaking, government, as well as liberty, is good; yet could I in common sense, ten years ago, have felicitated France on her enjoyment of a government, (for she then had a government,) without inquiry what the nature of that government was, or how it was administered? Can I now congratulate the same nation upon its freedom?"

Paine has crafted an artfully edited statement with which to skewer his adversary. Or did he accidentally reverse "could I" to "I could"? Either way, this was long before anyone had coined the term "Fake News."

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