Monday, September 25, 2017

The Art of Living

The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and EffectivenessThe Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness by Epictetus
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Easy to read, hard to do. "The first step to living wisely is to relinquish self-conceit." I'll get right on that...! I'm curious to read the original text by Epictetus now. This book is an interpretation by Sharon Lebell.

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The Legend of Sleepy HollowThe Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This story is just about as perfect as they come: a joy to read.

“He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weather-cock perched upon his spindle neck to tell which way the wind blew. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.” (p. 19)

“All these, however, were mere terrors of the night, phantoms of the mind that walk in darkness; and though he had seen many spectres in his time, and been more than once beset by Satan in divers shapes, in his lonely pre-ambulations, yet daylight put an end to all these evils; and he would have passed a pleasent life of it, in despite of the devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was - a woman.” (p. 33)

“I profess not to know how women's hearts are wooed and won. To me they have always been matters of riddle and admiration.” (p. 48)


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Sunday, September 3, 2017

A Guide to the Good Life

A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic JoyA Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Stoic joy sounds like it might be decidedly tepid, if you take the commonly held view of Stoicism and apply it such an ebullient emotion. But, the author argues, we have confused Stoicism as a philosophy of life with the commonly-held view of stoicism. It turns out that as a Stoic, you get to enjoy the positive emotions, while minimizing the effects of the negative ones. You are not required to give up or repress your emotions. Good days are celebrated. But dark days are sure to come. Marcus Aurelius famously said:

"Begin each day by telling yourself: Today I shall be meeting with interference, ingratitude, insolence, disloyalty, ill-will and selfishness--all of them due to the offenders' ignorance of what is good or evil."

The Stoics do not wear rose-colored glasses, especially when it comes to humanity. Instead, they re-frame many of the situations that typically cause anger, fear, or jealousy, so as to minimize the damage that these emotions do to ourselves and others. A good life is one marked by tranquility (as opposed to mere comfort), and the Stoics recognize that it is hard-won in this life. Why would you throw it away by indulging your anger or ruminating on fears that may never come to pass or striving to become rich and famous? Stoics are also bullet-proof when it comes to insults, one of the favorite weapons regularly deployed on the Internet and in real life.

For example, the author tells a story of an academic colleague who told him he was considering what stance he should take in refuting the author's position on an issue. This colleague said he hadn't decided whether to portray Irvine as merely misguided or actually evil. The author laughed and suggested to his colleague that he should consider painting him as both misguided and evil. Why limit himself to only one?

For a short, introductory type of book, "A Guide to the Good Life" has a number of practical suggestions that may help reduce the harmful effects of negative emotions, as well as a suggested reading program for those interested in learning more. Irvine is clear that a Stoic philosophy of life isn't for everyone. Many will choose to keep their default philosophy of "enlightened hedonism", thank you very much. But there's no reason it might not work for some.

“By contemplating the impermanence of everything in the world, we are forced to recognize that every time we do something could be the last time we do it, and this recognition can invest the things we do with a significance and intensity that would otherwise be absent.”

“One reason children are capable of joy is because they take almost nothing for granted.”

“The Stoics believed in social reform, but they also believed in personal transformation. More precisely, they thought the first step in transforming a society into one in which people live a good life is to teach people how to make their happiness depend as little as possible on their external circumstances. The second step in transforming a society is to change people’s external circumstances. The Stoics would add that if we fail to transform ourselves, then no matter how much we transform the society in which we live, we are unlikely to have a good life.”

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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Kidnapped, Redux

KidnappedKidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

After second reading (4 stars):
Either I've become a less discerning reader or the story has grown on me. Hands down, Mr. Rankeillor is my favorite character. But how can you not enjoy Alan Breck Stewart: the obstinate dandy?? "Am I no a bonny fighter?"

After first reading (3 stars):
While this story was mostly fast-paced and exciting, it did drag a few times. Redeemed from its reputation as a boys' novel (maybe that's why I never read it as a child?) and now considered a classic, "Kidnapped" held my interest and inspired several Internet searches into Scottish history. My favorite characters were the supporting ones, especially the wicked and greedy Ebenezer Balfour, the wily Highland cardshark Cluny Macpherson and the Latin-quoting lawyer Mr. Rankeillor.

My favorite quote: “I have seen wicked men and fools, a great many of both; and I believe they both get paid in the end; but the fools first.”

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

Better Than Before

Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday LivesBetter Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives by Gretchen Rubin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

4.5 stars: Rubin's framework of four habit tendencies may not convince every reader that she's on to something regarding habits. It's not based on rigorous behavioral science, but I think it can provide a fresh perspective for many people. One positive aspect of Rubin's framework is that it emphasizes how many different habit change approaches there are. That information alone can be encouraging if you've started to feel like you'll never change that darned habit. Maybe you just haven't tried the right approach.

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Thinking about Habits

That's what I've been doing lately. This comes compliments of Gretchen Rubin's website:

“To make Routine a Stimulus
Remember it can cease —
Capacity to Terminate
Is a Specific Grace —.”

-- Emily Dickinson, “To make Routine a Stimulus,” 1196

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Leisure

What is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.
No time to stand beneath the boughs
And stare as long as sheep or cows.
No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.
No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night.
No time to turn at Beauty's glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance.
No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began.
A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.
--W.H. Davies (1911)